Patrick McDonough’s lawn chairs are not meant for sitting. And if they begin to seem functional, well, it’s all pretend. The sculptures offer the formal concepts of lawn chairs without actually closing the deal — legs and armrests have gone missing, for starters, and the works themselves are decidedly non functional. Instead of functionality McDonough is interested in their allusions to an American iconography of leisure. Take a look at them and it’s not difficult to imagine the smell of freshly cut grass or the skyward boom of summertime fireworks. It’s part of what the artist describes as his overarching interest in the aesthetics of free time. But there’s something else that’s also at work here; each piece has a significant stake in pure color, in hard edged geometry, and in the rectangular chromatic plane. You won’t need to dig too deep before you start thinking of abstract painting. – Matthew Smith, Washington, D.C. Contributor, New American Paintings


123009-lawn chair; Wood, Paint, Outdoor Furniture Fabric, Hardware; 2012 


120310-lawn chair; Wood, Paint, Outdoor Furniture Fabric, Hardware; 2012 


 


120210-lawn chair; Wood, Paint, Outdoor Furniture Fabric, Hardware; 76" by 27" by 27"; 2012 


122909-lawn chair; Wood, Paint, Outdoor Furniture Fabric, Hardware; 2012 


120110-lawn chair; Wood, Paint, Outdoor Furniture Fabric, Hardware; 2012 


090809-lawn chair; Acrylic, Fabric, Wood, Plastic; 20” by 32” by 14”; 2009 


090709-lawn chair; Acrylic, Fabric, Wood, Plastic; 20” by 32” by 14”; 2009